Category Archives: Climbing

Bungee jumping… Our Bucket List Item

Bungee Jumping Kenya

Bungee jumping is an extreme sport in which people jump from higher ground such as a bridge with an elastic rope tied to their ankles to stop them from hitting the ground. The rope is designed to stretch, not break. When the rope has stretched all the way, the jumper bounces back up. When jumping they wear safety equipment like helmets and a harness.

Bungee started as the coming-of-age ceremony in a small village on South Pentecost Island in Vanuatu. The young men would jump from the top of a 30 meter high tree to demonstrate their courage as an adult. They tied jungle vines around their ankles so that they would not hit the ground.

Modern bungee jumping began when four British men jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. In 1987 A.J.Hackett became world famous when he jumped from the Eiffel Tower in Paris. Later he set up the Kawarau Bridge in New Zealand, with a height of 47 meters, as a commercial bungee jumping area. People could pay money for the fun of jumping.

In Kenya test you adrenaline with a bungee jump in Sagana along the Tana river banks

Travel and News December 2016 Newsletter

Hello,

The year is finally coming to an end and we are excited the festive holidays are here… As you look back, intended travel did not materialize for one reason or the other. Next year is another opportunity, see our travel tip section below…

We take this opportunity to thank you most sincerely for being part of A Plus, we are honored and privileged to have been of service to you this year and look forward to a great 2017. Continue reading

My Mount Kenya Experience – “The Independence”

Mount Kenya, Point Lenana

Climbing Mount Kenya had been in my bucket list just like Mount Kilimanjaro. What is most interesting is that Rotary turned me to a mountain climber. And more fulfilling because I was doing it for Charity. I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in 2015 and stocked a library in a rural school with books from class one to eight. Continue reading